Jigsaw puzzle

Why we need a new rural and remote health strategy

People living in rural and remote areas suffer significantly worse health outcomes than their city counterparts.   Country people don’t live as long, and have higher rates of disease and injury.  They also have less access to adequate health services.  More than six years ago all Australian State and Federal governments agreed something needed to be done.  They came up with a National Framework to guide and co-ordinate better health outcomes for country people.  But six years later, the Framework is gathering dust on a shelf, with no proof anything has been achieved.  Rural Australia deserves better.

Federal Rural Health Minister Bridget McKenzie declares to a packed audience at the recent 6th Rural and Remote Health Scientific Symposium #6rrhss that she shares the Alliance vision.

journal cover

The April issue of the Australian Journal of Rural Health is out now.  See the new open access research that defines just how low NHMRC funding is for rural and remote health research from lead author Professor Lesley Barclay.  She finds just 1.1% of reserach dollars has reached the sector between 2000-2014.

Australian Parliament House

Read our pre-Budget Submission on improving access to health care and getting the right health workers in the right places in rural and remote Australia.  These are priorities agreed by NRHA members at its annual meeting September 2017, and identified at the 14th Rural Health Conference held in Cairns, April 2017.

Image of white tablets

Medicines containing codeine are no longer available without a prescription. 

With support from the Australian Government, the National Rural Health Alliance is developing specialised information for people living in rural and remote areas to assist with the change.

the little book or rural health numbers